Information

Why are my faeces black in color after eating Oreos

Why are my faeces black in color after eating Oreos


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Why are my faeces black in colour the morning after I eat some Oreos?

Day 1 : Eat a handful of Oreos & the next morning your stool is black.
Day 3 : Eat a handful of cocoa flavored biscuits & the next morning your stool is normal.
Day 5 : Eat a handful of Chocolates & the next morning your stool is normal.

I'm aware of the beetroot digestion story, and how it doesn't happen to everyone. What is surprising in the case of Oreos is that it just takes a handful of Oreos to turn the stool black. But with any other biscuits or chocolates, my faeces are normal.

I don't have anything other than anecdotal evidence but a lot (NOT ALL) of my friends have had similar experience. Just Googling "Black stool after eating Oreos" & I see a lot of people (not all) having similar experience. Do note that to my knowledge it doesn't affect my body in any way.

Why is that the case? Why doesn't it happen to everybody? What ingredient in Oreos makes it happen? What is the physiological underpinning? Asking this question with curiosity than caution. Looking for biological/biochemical perspective.


This is a perfectly reasonable question based on a self-adminstered (human) trial. Morever, the proposer bases their observations not on one subject but several reports. The impromptu survey of friends etc. is also acceptable. By the way, self-reported intakes/output records are an accepted method in nutrition research.

My 2-year-old child exhibited the symptoms described above, after consuming two Oreo biscuits in the afternoon. That evenings soiled nappy (diaper) revealed a dark but otherwise well-textured stool. When my concerned partner brought this to my attention, it immediately reminded me of the use of carmine red and related food dyes for the measurement of gastrointestinal transit times. The principle here is that the dyes are not absorbed in the gut, so the time from consumption to excretion gives a measure of bowel function. Short transit time means no constipation and is considered a sign of great bowel function.

Based on the observations reported for Oreos, my educated guess would be that Oreo products contain miniscule amounts of non-absorbed colorants - something that is generally regarded as safe. Self-reported symptoms are generally considered valid by health professionals. I am still intrigued by the Oreo colouring puzzle, as this colourant must be natural.


According to this site there is something called black cocoa powder, a particularly dark product referred to as an ultra-Dutch processed cocoa powder. The site recommends this for anyone trying to reproduce the colour of Oreos, claiming that it acts more as a colouring agent than a flavouring agent.

The site also recommends two commercially-available products so now you should be able to do a real experiment by baking two batches of cookies that differ only in whether they contain this. Then you can report back here, but maybe this time with photographic evidence.


Common Causes of Red or Black Stool

Jay Yepuri, MD, MS, is a board-certified gastroenterologist and a practicing partner at Digestive Health Associates of Texas (DHAT).

Having red stools or black stools can cause a shock when you don't know why it's happening. Common reasons for a change in stool color include eating certain foods—especially those with artificial colors—and taking dietary supplements, such as iron.  

The cause of red stools or black stools could be nothing to worry about, such as those that are caused by food coloring. It's important to keep in mind, however, that red or black in the stool could be due to bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, small intestine, or large intestine).  

Blood is a warning sign for both serious digestive problems, such as colon cancer, and relatively common and easily treated problems, like hemorrhoids. Find out if the change in your stool color could be from something you ate or if you actually do need to call your doctor.


What makes Oreos so dark?

So this weekend I thought I'd try an experiment. I took the nutritional analysis for Oreos and the ingreident list for Oreos then I got the nutritional analysis for each ingredient. Then I figured out how the ingredients could be combined in such a way so as to reproduce the actual nutritional analysis of an Oreo. Thus I had a sort of "recipe" for an Oreo which I made. (One caveat: I actually used Canadian Oreos in my experiment, not US ones - I like the Canadian ones better. The recipes are different.)

The recipe I came up with tastes pretty good it does resemble an Oreo but it doesn't taste exactly the same. (I'll post it, if there is interest.) But even more than the taste, my recipe produces a much lighter colored cookie than an Oreo. In fact, Oreos are among the darkest chocolate wafers I've ever seen. They are practically black - which is quite surprising given the the majority of the cookie is flour and sugar.

One would think that Nabisco adds some type of color to an Oreo to make it so black. WRONG! There is no color on the ingredient list. It must come from the cocoa and chocolate (the Canadian version actually only contains cocoa, no chocolate). But as far as I can tell, no amount of cocoa will produce such a dark cookie. Could Nabisco have some special type of cocoa that they are using, perhaps an "extra dark roast"? Has anyone ever made a cookie as black as an Oreo without adding color?


These Foods Can Change The Color Of Your Poop

There’s a monumental scene from “ Portlandia” that all too accurately depicts what it’s like to see red in the toilet bowl and — in a moment of panic — forget that you’ve recently eaten beets.

Beets and beyond, there are some foods that tend to change the color of your stool. Sometimes a strange color can be a sign of a health issue — and when it’s accompanied by other symptoms, it may be a reason for concern. But it’s important to keep in mind that sometimes food is the culprit of a wacky poo.

“Stool is made up of everything we eat, so basically what goes in, comes out,” Lisa Ganjhu, a clinical associate professor of medicine at NYU’s School of Medicine, told HuffPost.

“The digestive process with the enzymes and bile will change the stools to a general tone of brown,” she said, noting that stool color tends to range from a light brown to a dark brown because the food gets mixed with bile pigment to help with digestion.

So the next time you see something a little irregular in the bowl, think about whether you’ve consumed any of the foods below before you start to worry.

Beets

The aforementioned root veggie causes many people’s poop to turn a dark red color that can sometimes look like blood. Scary!

Red beets contain betacyanin, which is what gives them their deep hue. While the digestive process breaks down most chemicals in ways that make them lose their colors, betacyanin is processed differently for different people. You may or may not notice a red tint to your poop (and pee!) post-beet-fest.

If you were indeed eating beets in the last few days before your reddish poop, you’re most likely in the clear. If you notice red streaks in your poop and have not been consuming beets (or any other red food items on this list), it could be blood. In this case, it’s best to consult with your doctor right away about what to do next.

Green Veggies

If you like to load up on greens like spinach, broccoli and lettuce, your poop may reflect that. Foods that contain a lot of chlorophyll, a green pigment present in many naturally green foods, may end up coming out in a color similar to the one they first began.

Green poop is usually benign, but it may sometimes be an indication of a potential health problem, according to Live Science . Infections like salmonella may sometimes lead to green stool — but these are often accompanied by other issues, including diarrhea, stomach cramps and fever. Chances are if you’re feeling healthy and not experiencing any other symptoms, your green doo is just a sign that you’ve been eating your veggies.

Blueberries

The color is in the name, so don’t let yourself be too surprised if your poop is having a Smurf moment after you’ve been noshing on blueberries. These small-but-potent berries may color your feces with a blue or black tinge some people have reported seeing green from eating blueberries as well.

You know your poop is just reacting to your diet if you see a color change after loading up on berries. There is, however, a rare condition called porphyria that can lead to bluish-purple waste. The disorder often shows up with other symptoms, including nausea, breathing problems and seizures, according to the Mayo Clinic .

Food Coloring

In 2017, Oreo and Peeps teamed up to make Peeps Oreos, a novelty snack with a bright pink filling. Almost as soon as the product launched, people reported (on Twitter, naturally) pink poop.

The cookie sandwich relied on e rythrosine, also known as Red No. 3 , to get its bubble gum pink color that drew people to it in the first place. The body does not break down artificial coloring, Anish Sheth, a doctor specializing in gastroenterology told Mic back when the pink cookie debacle first surfaced.

It’s the same reason that Burger King’s black Halloween burger turned consumers’ stools green back in 2015 a combination of blue, red, yellow and caramel-colored food dyes turned the burger bun black but resulted in green-colored stool because of how the dyes were digested and mixed with other fluids in the body. Science! It’s cool. The green poop certainly gave consumers a shock, but was ultimately nothing to be concerned about.

Medications

OK, this isn’t a food necessarily, but it is something you ingest so it’s worth mentioning. Certain medications may have an effect on your stool color.

Bismuth subsalicylate, the generic name for Pepto-Bismol, can make both your saliva and your poop go a little goth — but the change is temporary and harmless. Radiogardase (also known as Prussian blue), a medication that helps remove radioactive compounds from the body, may cause a person’s poop to turn blue for as long as the medication is taken.

Bottom line: If you know you ate something suspect, you’re probably OK. But if you’re slightly worried, it’s best to call up your doctor just to rule out any concerns.

While the color of your stool often reflects what you’ve been eating lately, certain colors, including white, black or red, can signal a more serious concern, according to Ganjhu. White, pale or gray stool is an indicator of a biliary obstruction.

“That means the bile duct can be blocked by a stone, a mass or cancer,” she said. “The bile is not making its way to the GI tract and the bile pigment is not getting mixed in with the stool.”

And black stool can be an indicator of digested blood. “If someone had a bleeding stomach ulcer, the blood makes it way down the GI tract, gets digested with enzymes and turns black,” Ganjhu said.

When stool is bright red or bloody, it’s possible there is bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. If brown stool contains a streak of blood, Ganjhu said, an ulcer, hemorrhoid or fissure could be a possibility, as can colon cancer. In the case of any of these funky poop colors, Ganjhu said it’s a good idea to be medically evaluated as soon as possible.

“The rest of the rainbow of stool color are based on your diet or what you put in your system,” she said. “When in doubt, please see a doctor.”


99.2 feber and black stool

Fever is mild and black stool is Malina. widaltest is to be done or clinical diagnosis is to be made.

Download Here Free HealthCareMagic App to Ask a Doctor

All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions


Coronavirus symptoms update: Has your poo turned this colour? It may signal COVID-19

Link copied

UK coronavirus cases see biggest daily rise in two months

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they'll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Coronavirus has launched a fusillade of attacks on humanity this year, evidenced by the global death toll, which is in touching distance of 800,000 by official estimates. Symptoms act as a paper trail for scientists to document the destructive impact COVID-19 has on the body. This has led them to some surprising findings along the way.

Trending

READ MORE

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease so symptoms related to the lungs were to be expected.

As the NHS explains, the main symptoms are loss of smell, a new, continuous cough and a high temperature - common characteristics of a respiratory infection.

What has raised eyebrows is the symptoms not automatically associated with respiratory problems.

A number of disconcerting digestive symptoms have come out of the woodwork, for example.

Coronavirus symptoms: Black or tarry stool may be a sign (Image: Getty Images)

According to a study published by researchers in Beijing, four to 13.7 percent of infected individuals experienced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding.

GI bleeding is any type of bleeding that starts in your GI tract, also called your digestive tract.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIH), symptoms of GI bleeding may include black or tarry stools.

Other GI symptoms include:

  • Bright red blood in vomit
  • Cramps in the abdomen
  • Dark or bright red blood mixed with stool
  • Dizziness or faintness
  • Feeling tired
  • Paleness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • Weakness

Related articles

The same study also found that one to 29.4 percent of people experienced nausea and 2.2 to six percent experienced abdominal pain.

To gather their findings, the researchers analysed all the COVID-19 clinical studies and case reports related to digestive issues published between December 2019 and February 2020.

Other lesser-known warning signs

People with COVID-19 are also experiencing neurological symptoms and these may occur with or without respiratory symptoms, according to Harvard Health.

For example, COVID-19 affects brain function in some people, explains the health body.

Coronavirus symptoms: Tingling in the hands or feet may signal COVID-19 (Image: Getty Images)

READ MORE

"Specific neurological symptoms seen in people with COVID-19 include loss of smell, inability to taste, muscle weakness, tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, dizziness, confusion, delirium, seizures, and stroke," it adds.

What should I do if I recognise the symptoms?

"If you have any of the main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), get a test as soon as possible. Stay at home until you get the result," advises the NHS.

Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, must also stay at home until you get your result, says the health body.

A support bubble is where someone who lives alone (or just with their children) can meet people from one other household.

Related articles

How to alleviate symptoms: Drink plenty of fluids (Image: Getty Images)

Can I treat my symptoms while I await my result?

There is currently no specific treatment for coronavirus (COVID-19), but you can often ease the symptoms at home until you recover.

If you have a high temperature, the NHS says it can help to:

  • Get lots of rest
  • Drink plenty of fluids (water is best) to avoid dehydration &ndash drink enough so your pee is light yellow and clear
  • Take paracetamol or ibuprofen if you feel uncomfortable

It is worth noting that there have been some news reports of anti-inflammatory painkillers, such as ibuprofen, making coronavirus worse.

The Commission on Human Medicines has now confirmed there is no clear evidence that using ibuprofen to treat symptoms such as a high temperature makes coronavirus worse.


These Foods Can Change The Color Of Your Poop

There’s a monumental scene from “ Portlandia” that all too accurately depicts what it’s like to see red in the toilet bowl and — in a moment of panic — forget that you’ve recently eaten beets.

Beets and beyond, there are some foods that tend to change the color of your stool. Sometimes a strange color can be a sign of a health issue — and when it’s accompanied by other symptoms, it may be a reason for concern. But it’s important to keep in mind that sometimes food is the culprit of a wacky poo.

“Stool is made up of everything we eat, so basically what goes in, comes out,” Lisa Ganjhu, a clinical associate professor of medicine at NYU’s School of Medicine, told HuffPost.

“The digestive process with the enzymes and bile will change the stools to a general tone of brown,” she said, noting that stool color tends to range from a light brown to a dark brown because the food gets mixed with bile pigment to help with digestion.

So the next time you see something a little irregular in the bowl, think about whether you’ve consumed any of the foods below before you start to worry.

Beets

The aforementioned root veggie causes many people’s poop to turn a dark red color that can sometimes look like blood. Scary!

Red beets contain betacyanin, which is what gives them their deep hue. While the digestive process breaks down most chemicals in ways that make them lose their colors, betacyanin is processed differently for different people. You may or may not notice a red tint to your poop (and pee!) post-beet-fest.

If you were indeed eating beets in the last few days before your reddish poop, you’re most likely in the clear. If you notice red streaks in your poop and have not been consuming beets (or any other red food items on this list), it could be blood. In this case, it’s best to consult with your doctor right away about what to do next.

Green Veggies

If you like to load up on greens like spinach, broccoli and lettuce, your poop may reflect that. Foods that contain a lot of chlorophyll, a green pigment present in many naturally green foods, may end up coming out in a color similar to the one they first began.

Green poop is usually benign, but it may sometimes be an indication of a potential health problem, according to Live Science . Infections like salmonella may sometimes lead to green stool — but these are often accompanied by other issues, including diarrhea, stomach cramps and fever. Chances are if you’re feeling healthy and not experiencing any other symptoms, your green doo is just a sign that you’ve been eating your veggies.

Blueberries

The color is in the name, so don’t let yourself be too surprised if your poop is having a Smurf moment after you’ve been noshing on blueberries. These small-but-potent berries may color your feces with a blue or black tinge some people have reported seeing green from eating blueberries as well.

You know your poop is just reacting to your diet if you see a color change after loading up on berries. There is, however, a rare condition called porphyria that can lead to bluish-purple waste. The disorder often shows up with other symptoms, including nausea, breathing problems and seizures, according to the Mayo Clinic .

Food Coloring

In 2017, Oreo and Peeps teamed up to make Peeps Oreos, a novelty snack with a bright pink filling. Almost as soon as the product launched, people reported (on Twitter, naturally) pink poop.

The cookie sandwich relied on e rythrosine, also known as Red No. 3 , to get its bubble gum pink color that drew people to it in the first place. The body does not break down artificial coloring, Anish Sheth, a doctor specializing in gastroenterology told Mic back when the pink cookie debacle first surfaced.

It’s the same reason that Burger King’s black Halloween burger turned consumers’ stools green back in 2015 a combination of blue, red, yellow and caramel-colored food dyes turned the burger bun black but resulted in green-colored stool because of how the dyes were digested and mixed with other fluids in the body. Science! It’s cool. The green poop certainly gave consumers a shock, but was ultimately nothing to be concerned about.


Hi I would recommend a stool analysis for blood test and if its positive a rectal examination and a colonoscopy along with complete blood count.

hello, black foul smelling semi solid stools can be caused by bleeding in GI tract. red blood is most commonly due to hemorrhoids

Download Here Free HealthCareMagic App to Ask a Doctor

All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions


What can cause babies' black poop?

As mentioned above, black baby poop can be caused by drinking an iron-fortified formula. Many babies drink this type of formula to ensure they're getting enough iron in their diets, and it can turn their stool a black color. This is not normally a cause for concern, but it's always a good idea to check with your pediatrician to be sure.

Sometimes, you may notice flecks of blood in a baby's poop that looks black, kind of like poppy seeds, which is an indication it's been digested. Typically this comes from breastfeeding and baby swallowing bits of blood from mom's nipples that may be swollen or cracked. This is also totally normal.

As your child grows older and expands their diet to include solid foods, black poop may still appear from time to time, but this is usually due to ingesting certain foods. For instance, black licorice, grape juice, blueberries, or even Oreo cookies can turn a child's stool partially black.

Medicines can also be a cause of black poop, most notably antacid medications usually taken to treat upset stomach or heartburn. Iron supplements, whether taken as multivitamins or as part of iron-fortified formula, can also cause stools to turn black.


Common Causes of Black Stool

  • Gastritis
  • Upper GI bleeding (from the stomach or small intestine)
  • Duodenal ulcer
  • Certain medication like aspirin and ibuprofen that damage the lining of the stomach
  • Trauma to the region

Other causes that are less concerning. Ideally, you want to fall under this list, since the black poop will go away once you stop eating or taking that food or medication.

  • Certain medicines like Pepto-Bismol
  • Iron supplements or tablet
  • Eating a lot of blueberries
  • Eating black licorice


Watch the video: Τι δείχνει το χρώμα των ούρων για την υγεία μας (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Neilan

    Sorry for interfering ... I understand this issue. Let's discuss.

  2. Henwas

    And I believe her !!!

  3. Zulkizuru

    It is the amusing information

  4. Vudocage

    You have understood not at all well.

  5. Tugore

    Yeah ... It's not very developed yet, so we'll have to wait a bit.



Write a message